Graduation

Jul. 15th, 2014 11:05 pm
lloll4: ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse (Default)
Well! Convocation, that is.

Law school... it's a stage that people who wanted to go to law school, who did go to law school, eventually to go through? I'm tolerably pleased about convocation, and it was a bit jolting to realise that I'm done with the school part of things. I found myself with a lot of anomie, though, waiting for the ceremonies to be over. I can't relate to all these young thangs seated beside me, alternately nervous and cynical and excited (judging by the comments I overheard).

But afterwards we went out for dinner with my family and it felt better. Much less disquieting. I got flowers, which were a nice touch.
lloll4: wukong from Stephen Chow movie (wukong)
The first paragraph of an article we have to read, "The Role of Subjective Benefit in the Law of Unjust Enrichment" by Michael Garner, in 1990:

The boundaries of the law of unjust enrichment are only now being drawn. The way has been pioneered by Goff and Jones and Birks, and in the spirit of true frontiersmen they have sought to annex as much territory as possible. Much of the ground claimed by them has been taken legitimately. But in certain areas they have transgressed. In particular, it is submitted that by adopting an overinclusive concept of subjective benefit through the vehicle of 'free acceptance' they have staked too great a claim. And that threatens the conceptual purity of the developing doctrine of unjust enrichment, but also its status as a legitimate legal event having as much a place in English law as contract and tort.

"...they have transgressed"? I feel like I'm reading literary theory again. Conceptual purity?

Academic writing, you gotta love it.
lloll4: ponyo refuses piece of bread (ponyo don't want bread)
Belated realisation about why I'm checking the school website again for updates on syllabus/reading list: not because I thought I missed something, but because I was hoping the reading list would have miraculously disappeared and with it, the requirement to finish reading ___, ___, and ___ by today. How little we know of ourselves!
lloll4: my blue Niebling shawl (niebling)
Law of restitution: really fascinating topic, with a side of hilarity because of all the differing theoretical views held by academics, each insisting he is right, or at least more right than the next guy. It's about the intellectual equivalent of watching one's pet contort itself so that it can lick itself in various places. Tho' quite a bit of reading because of that, which I'm a bit worried about.

Legal theory/jurisprudence: My approach to theory - tho' previously in the realm of literary theory - was mostly: yeah, you have a point, but you're just (again) contorting yourself again and not taking data into account. At least with literary theory you have to point to a book sooner or later, but I'm finding legal theory a lot more amorphous. Which runs in the face of my expectation because one would think law, y'know, it has legislation and it has politics and it has human and sociological factors, so actually it's more rooted in actual stuff than literature...

IT and the law: Um, right now a bit head-scratchy. The introductory seminar was very, well, introductory.

IP law: First seminar was... boring. Or could be because I was feeling under the weather, but the prof went thr' stuff we already knew or could have picked up from his assigned reading anyway, so.

3rd year

Aug. 18th, 2013 04:37 pm
lloll4: ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse (ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse)
All this talk about how the JD programme is 2.5 years (or 2 years for the ambitious) has obscured the fact that I am now starting my 3rd year of school. I have been in school for 2 years! I'm not sure how to feel about it: there's a vibe of 'only 2 years? how time flies' all mixed up with the inner feeling of 'has it been 2 years? can't wait for it to be over'.

I'm taking 4 classes this term:
1) Legal theory and philosophy: why oh why???
2) Law of restitution: which seems complicated but should be really interesting.
3) IT and the law: first class's reading is Lessig's Code 2.0. Go figure. Also the prof decided to update class stuff on tumblr.
4) IP law: I really wanted to take this, but left this till the last term because it's offered every term, and I wanted to take other less easily available electives first. I guess anyone who's been using social media would naturally be interested in IP, plus one doesn't go thr' undergrad English (the early modern period at least) without a passing interest in copyright. I also have a vague acquaintance with trade mark law, but am hazy about the other stuff. Well, we shall see.

revision-y

Apr. 1st, 2013 01:59 am
lloll4: ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse (sleepy ponyo)
What really tickled me the first time I read up on property law was that textbooks usually used, as an example of a name for a piece of real estate, "Blackacre" (and "Whiteacre" if required). Does that not sound more like what the Beast's castle (as in Beauty and the Beast) should be called?

So, revising property law. The interesting thing about this term is that I'm taking (as is my cohort) both property law and the law of equity and trusts, and boy are there loads of overlap. And by the way, I'm sick of writing "constructive trusts" and "resulting trusts" and have resorted to the profs' "CT" and "RT" though I think that may get a tad confusing in exam scripts. Or not? I was just reading this little article by my law property prof about how to teach equity (is expert in both) and one of the points brought up was how his students found it difficult to get into equity because there's no unifying theme, so as to speak, unlike say, contract law which is about (so says the textbook) the exchange of promises. Equity is this morass of principles which seem sort of sensible and then goes really outlandish on development. So yes, prof, I'm with your ex-students on being confused. I can see this is going to take a bit of time.

so yeah

Mar. 15th, 2013 12:00 am
lloll4: ponyo peering out from under jellyfish (ponyo curious)
Required journal article on reading list: "Remedies of the Caveatee under section 127 of the Land Titles Act."

Found: "Remedies of the Caveatte under section 127 of the Land Titles Act."

It's probably the lateness of the hour that causes me to find more amusement than this typo actually contains. But hahaha.

yah

Mar. 4th, 2013 10:18 pm
lloll4: ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse (ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse)
This is ultimately my fault, but I'm torn between being peeved and being relieved. We had a paper that was supposed to be due this Wednesday, so I ignored readings to be done for other classes in favour of getting it done on time... Then today the prof said the deadline's been extended to next Monday.

Yeah.

I know. I could have done my reading first, eh?

eeek

Feb. 13th, 2013 11:51 pm
lloll4: ponyo refuses piece of bread (ponyo don't want bread)
This is not a nice LNY. I've got a shitload of work coming up in the next week that must be done within next week and then LNY will be over. Not to mention that all the make-up classes this month is cutting into my Saturdays this month. I hate these make-up classes. Or at least, in addition to the fact that they happen in LNY.

Happy LNY, anyway.

***

ETA: Okay, I wanted to blog about this case but kept forgetting. It was for my equity and trusts class and frankly not that significant. It's about a species of trust called a Quistclose trust, which apparently is supposed to be what happens when A lends B money for the purpose of paying B's creditor C. Apparently this means that if B for some reason is unable to pay C (B goes bankrupt or whatever) that money would go back to A since it's in a trust for A. Which is a little weird because you'd think that the money would be for B's many, many other creditors E, F, G, etc, right? In class, we went through a bunch of academic and judicial opinions on the Quistclose trust, which just means no one really knows what to think about it. Just lovely.

Anyway, this case isn't as much about Quistclose trusts (though it was on the reading list for that reason) as it is about a public organisation that is inexplicably gullible and makes me embarrassed to think it represents my country: Singapore Tourism Board v Children's Media )

schoooool

Feb. 5th, 2013 01:37 am
lloll4: ponyo stuck in a bottle (ponyo in bottle)
The only positive thing I can say about taking property law and equity in the same term is that sometimes the readings coincide. Phew!

Have midterm, two presentations, and a paper due in two weeks. Ugh.
lloll4: ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse (sleepy ponyo)
1) Is it only Wednesday? It feels like it should be Thursday already, mainly because now the bulk of my classes are on Mondays and Tuesdays. Tho' am going to start going to gym today now that my cold seems to have cleared up; knees starting to get creaky again.

2) Got into contract drafting class after all, yay! (Someone dropped it and I squeezed in.) It's pretty interesting, even with the prof's tendency to read from judgments.

3) More interesting news: My Kindle Paperwhite has arrived! I lost my Kindle Touch at the beginning of the year and decided to try the Paperwhite. (Or should that be Paperwhite Kindle?) Thoughts:

(a) It does not have text-to-speech capability. I did not know this. Admittedly, I hadn't used it much with my Kindle Touch, but it's still a nice-to-have feature.

(b) Don't have much use for the lighted (lit?) screen feature yet, though it feels a bit glaring. Will assess again when I finally read it in dim lighting.

(c) Enables you to have dictionaries in different languages - admittedly only in the 7, 8 languages that it supports. But it's a step up from the determinedly monolingualism of before.

(d) Much, much better looking Chinese font. And Japanese font. (There's only two choices tho' - the nice one and the ugly one.) For that matter, the (limited) choices of font for alphanumeric scripts are nice to have too.
lloll4: ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse (ponyo grabs ham)
s 3(2), definition of "relevant":

"One fact is said to relevant to another when the one is connected with other in any of the ways referred to in the provisions of this Act relating to the relevancy of facts."

Is it just me, or does this sound a lot like the rules for filling out sudoku?

On the elective class front, things are a tad sticky. A classmate wants to drop out of the class that I originally wanted to take, but isn't sure. And if this heel-dragging goes on, I'm not sure if I want to take it now, in the second week (or possibly the third week). Am perhaps crazy for now (slightly) preferring the class on legal theory because exam.
lloll4: erhu (erhu)
Textbook list

Property law
amended list )
Equity and trusts

It gets long )

Although at this junction what's really important to me about trusts is to better appreciate:

"'...But only consider, my dear girl! The whole fortune left in trust until I'm twenty-five, unless I marry before that date! You must see what a devil of a fix I'm in!'" (Friday's Child, Heyer).

Evidence and procedure
Read more... )
lloll4: ponyo refuses piece of bread (ponyo don't want bread)
I am stymied.

Law of international trade, contrary to my expectation* of WTO-ness, turned out to be (projected) on three main things:
1) Sale of goods, including SOGA and CISG
2) Bills of lading and carriage of goods by sea
3) Documentary credit such as letters of credit.

I've taken a class in shipping, which covered (2) and one in banking, which covered (3) and contract law covered bits of (1), admittedly shallowly.

I don't think I want to re-do stuff I've done before. Unfortunately, the alternative (limited, due to timetable clashes) is ether Insolvency law or theories of law, of which I'd lean towards theories except for the awful exam date (two exams in one day). I could do insolvency?... I'm not excited about it, but I could - but the exam date isn't that great either (leading to two exams on consecutive days).

Needs a think-through. And quickly. Damn it, I don't need this drama while trying to catch up on my readings.

*You might have thought that I'd know what the course covered before choosing it. I would except that the school's wacky system apparently thought it a good idea to hide important information, like required textbooks and reading lists, from enrollees.


Random )

class

Jan. 8th, 2013 09:09 am
lloll4: ponyo spits water (ponyo spitting water)
Equity prof: You will require 10 hours of preparation per week. (It looks it.)
Evidence prof: You will require 3 hours of preparation per week. (Hah!)

COURSE COORDINATOR: You should take another class because the one that you wanted, contract drafting, is full and it's unlikely to have dropouts.
MR: *stupidly believes* Yeh, ok, put me down for international trade.
CLASSMATE: Guess what! I got into contract drafting because someone dropped out at the last minute.
ME: Well, damn.


ETA: Emailed CC querying sitch. CC phoned back, things clarified. Faith in humanity restored. Heh.

(I don't mind international trade... I think? I haven't had a class yet. But I would have preferred contract drafting, not least because it has no exams.)

Dear prof, why is it that you not only persist in using Arial Narrow, a font I dislike, not just for class notes but also make it a requirement of the research paper?

Feeling sneezy, which I self-diagnose as a psychosomatic symptom of "going back to school".
lloll4: wukong from Stephen Chow movie (wukong)
Last year I had a prof who, in between talking about cases, started telling us about his time as a law student and it was only when he started talking about how he 'got' cases from from his cubbyhole that I realised, what d'you mean, someone found those cases and delivered them to you?

How is it that I only get pages and pages of citations and I have to look them up myself, which takes ages, and honestly, by the time I've 'got' all the required cases, my will to read them has evaporated?

Yeah, in the pre-online database age, it was probably a much more onerous task if one had to look up every law report collection, and to read them, take notes, photocopy - the utter legwork of it all. So I guess law schools in the past helped out? I freely admit still to a nagging sense of unfairness, though. What time I spend on looking for cases through different databases is really much better spent on reading them, y'know.

Another way of saying that I did. not. realise equity reading is 50 cases for the first two weeks (well, 45 cases and 5 journal articles).
lloll4: ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse (ponyo hands and feet)
Studying for exams is, by itself, an anxiety-inducing process of "my god I'll never finish revising" and "can I get away with only revising 2/3 of the course?", coupled with distractions such as:

1) Must. not. buy. yarn. (even if it's on sale!)
2) Do not go on the internet (except... well. Here I am. Plus the school did not post the exam venues until today [it had some, but the list was incomplete], so you'd definitely have to go online and check! gah.)
3) guzheng exam!
4) This is random sneezing and it's not a cold. Not a cold. I don't have a cold.
5) *guilty* I read the new Bujold. But it was about Ivan!
6) Need to send Christmas cards.

Yosh!

Nov. 8th, 2012 10:42 am
lloll4: ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse (ponyo broken bottle)
Am done with conflicts presentation!! W00t!

An exaggeration of course. I have worked thr' the question and I think I've covered what needs to be covered. Some niggling points to discuss over with teammates, and more reading up to do. But I think the outline is fine.

Next, shipping presentation. It's ironic that I'm working on contractual issues in charterparties considering how contracts are not my strongest subject. But am I being overly optimistic in thinking that the more studying I do, I understand it better?

Was groaning about preparing for corporate law class today when I realised I've already made notes for the presentation today. Thank goodness.
lloll4: ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse (ice lolly shaped like Mickey Mouse)
Next term's schedule, which has just been released, makes me so annoyed. Because it contains core classes, I can't even drop them, so it looks like for 13 weeks next year, I'm going to have to take this utterly fucked-up schedule, which not only contains two 3-hour classes (not back to back, but ugh) in one day but also two night classes. I utterly loathe night classes, not only because I am so not a night person and not being a teenager anymore I can't go on after 8-9pm* but also this means I can't teach in the evening any more on those two days. This results in the really awful prospect of having to teach on other evenings, which does mean that all my weekday evenings will be taken up. The alternative is, of course, to do without an income stream, but you know, I like eating.

(I can't even take the damned module next year, because I finish up at the end of next year - all going well - and it is apparently only offered in the winter term for my course - and of course, there is no gurantee that even if I do the extreme thing and stretch my study plan out just to take it in winter 2014, it will NOT be a night class. Because the school's planning skills are so awe-inspiring, really.)

So it's Hobson's Choice.

I mean, really. I have already had to put up with all kinds of shitty scheduling problems due to shipping law but I can't blame anyone because it's an elective that I chose, so I keep my grumbles to a minimum, but this goddamn compulsory class's timing is giving me all sorts of die-in-a-fire rage.

*I can teach after that time***, but that's because I'm the one talking and in control. Plus in fact I'm already about to collapse on the inside; my latest classes - the ones I teach, I mean - last until 9.30. I stretch my concentration further by drinking lots of tea and giving myself surreptitious pinches to keep alert. To ask that I take a class from 6 to 9.15pm** is ugh... a little bit beyond human endurance? Keeping in mind you're marked on class participation. You have to do class presentations. It's just- I did it last term and it was very exhausting. I did it, and I don't want to do it anymore.

**The other night class is until 7.30pm. Not too awful timewise, but it does kill off any opportunity I have of teaching that particular evening unless I can arrange to teach from 8 to 9.30pm.

***I do, however, do my studying (and writing) late at night out of pure lack-of-time-ness and also that there are less interruptions at night. I keep nodding off between paragraphs. I'd really just prefer to study during the day, or mornings.

ETA: And that's not including the goddamn make-up classes. Because the school has a policy that if classes fall on public holidays, they should be made up on Saturdays. Which in next term number three. Three holidays, I mean. Two for Lunar New Year, one for Good Friday. All will be made-up on Saturdays the week before or after. And you know what, people have regularly scheduled stuff to do on Saturdays! Look, if I cannot teach in the evenings, then I have to teach on Saturdays, and I really cannot cancel on Saturdays more than once. It's my most heavily scheduled day of the week: 10 to 6. It's bad for my students and makes my boss side-eye me a lot, okay?

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